SGTrains.comSGTrains.com ›

What Happens When New Trains Begin the Dynamic Testing Phase?

The 7th-gen Alstom Movia R151 train for the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL) on mainline testing. (Photo: SGTrains)

The 7th-gen Alstom Movia R151 train for the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL) on mainline testing. (Photo: SGTrains)

Before new trains are allowed to be commissioned, it has to undergo stringent testing and commissioning works, which can take months for engineers to certify the train as fit, safe, performant and ready for passenger service.

Such testing and commissioning work that new trains are required to pass include “static tests” and “dynamic tests” — but what are the differences between those two types of tests?

Interested in reading our future posts?
Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Telegram to get the latest updates!


The Dynamic Testing Phase for New Trains

Difference from the Static Testing phase

A refurbished Alstom Metropolis C751A train undergoing water tightness test in the static testing phase. (Screengrab: SGTrains)

A refurbished Alstom Metropolis C751A train undergoing water tightness test in the static testing phase. (Screengrab: SGTrains)

During the static testing phase, the train will remain in the depot for testing and will not be moved under its own power, hence the term “static”.

Such works include functional tests on the emergency detrainment ramps, control tests for the saloon doors and water tightness tests of the train’s body shell.

The train can only progress into the dynamic testing phase upon validation and verification that the train has passed all static tests.

Early stages of the Dynamic Testing phase

A refurbished Alstom Metropolis C751A train departing the test track within Sengkang Depot. (Screengrab: SGTrains)

A refurbished Alstom Metropolis C751A train departing the test track within Sengkang Depot. (Screengrab: SGTrains)

In the early stages of the dynamic testing phase, engineers will check various onboard components such as the braking, propulsion, signalling and communication systems.

These tests are conducted at the test track located in the train depot, where it will go back and forth along the stretch of the test track.

It also allows engineers to run various test agendas over several cycles, concurrently recording mileage that prepares the train for the next testing stage.

With the large amounts of data and telemetry logs collected during the tests, engineers will analyse them to determine whether the train is fit for mainline testing.

Mainline testing stage of the Dynamic Testing phase

A refurbished Alstom Metropolis C751A train on mainline testing after train service hours. (Screengrab: SGTrains)

A refurbished Alstom Metropolis C751A train on mainline testing after train service hours. (Screengrab: SGTrains)

When interfacing works are successful – that the train can “talk with” the control centre through the communications and signalling systems – it is ready for testing on the mainline.

The mainline testing stage is usually conducted after train service hours as a precaution, should it encounter any teething faults or problems that may cause it to stall.

This stage of testing is crucial as it is a real-world test with real-world circumstances for the train, and engineers will also look into data and telemetry logs collected by the train.

Such logs collected include acceleration, deceleration and jerk rate figures for the propulsion system, ride comfort indices for carriage vibrations, and air pressure tests for the brakes.

New train ready to be commissioned for Passenger Service

A new Kawasaki Heavy Industries & CRRC Qingdao Sifang C151C train commencing passenger service on Sep 30, 2018. (Credits: SMRT/YouTube)

A new Kawasaki Heavy Industries & CRRC Qingdao Sifang C151C train commencing passenger service on Sep 30, 2018. (Credits: SMRT/YouTube)

This part of testing and commissioning work can sometimes excite many trainspotters – the train’s first day of passenger service!

It can still be considered a “test” as the newly commissioned train encounters real and dynamic passenger weights and stressors over the course of one operational day.

The onboard predictive maintenance sensors and systems are also given a bit of a stretch as it scours through the different atmospheric and environmental variables.

7th-Gen Alstom Movia R151 Trains for the NSEWL

The 7th-gen Alstom Movia R151 train for the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL) on mainline testing. (Photo: SGTrains)

The 7th-gen Alstom Movia R151 train for the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL) on mainline testing. (Photo: SGTrains)

Local trainspotters have spotted the new and upcoming seventh-generation Alstom Movia R151 trains for the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL) on mainline testing in January.

To link back to this article, the R151 trains are currently in the dynamic testing phase and were observed to be trailing behind the last scheduled passenger train on the EWL.

The R151 trains are expected to be commissioned for passenger service once the dynamic tests are completed.

Behind the Upgrade of First Generation NEL Trains



Interested in reading our future posts?
Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Telegram to get the latest updates!


Check Out Other Related Posts

Sneak Preview of New 7th Generation MRT Trains for North-South & East-West Lines

First Upgraded Train for North East Line To Enter Passenger Service From Feb 28

New 3rd Generation MRT Train for the Circle Line Arrives in Singapore


Related Links
Alstom Metropolis C751A – SGTrains
Alstom Metropolis C851E (Circle Line) – SGTrains
Alstom Metropolis C851E (North East Line) – SGTrains
Alstom Movia R151 – SGTrains
Alstom Innovia APM 300R C801B – SGTrains
Delivery of Alstom Movia R151 – SGTrains


External Links
Behind the Upgrade of First Generation NEL Trains – SGTrains/YouTube [Accessed 14 Jan 2023]
Upgrading of North East Line Train – LTA/YouTube [Accessed 14 Jan 2023]
Throwback: Launch of C151C Train! – SMRT/YouTube [Accessed 14 Jan 2023]
“Ride comfort refers to human tolerance to vibration exposure over time. Presently, ISO 2631, EN 12,299 and Sperling’s method are the most common evaluation methods for assessing passenger comfort on trains.” – Yanran Jiang via International Journal of Rail Transportation: Vol 7, No 4/Taylor & Francis [Accessed 14 Jan 2023]
“We’re LIVE from Tuas Depot, home to our new North-South and East-West Line (#NSEWL) trains! 🚆❤️💚” – LTA/Facebook [Accessed 14 Jan 2023]


Images: Screengrabs from Behind the Upgrade of First Generation NEL Trains – SGTrains/YouTube and Throwback: Launch of C151C Train! – SMRT/YouTube.
This article first appeared on SGTrains.
Last updated on 14 Jan 2023.

Interested in reading our future posts?
Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Telegram to get the latest updates!


 

Loh

I'm a train enthusiast who is broadly interested in the different means of technology which powers Singapore's train network.